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LUCID DREAMING CHANGES YOU NOT ONLY DURING THE NIGHT

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BEING ABLE TO LUCID DREAM AT NIGHT AFFECTS YOUR AWARENESS DURING THE DAY.

If you feel that you are aware of reality while you are dreaming then it makes you more aware while you are awake.

People who regularly go through a lucid dreaming experience, either by chance or by choice, can improve their mental abilities during the day.

Controlled sleep (controlled by you, not by somebody else) can lead to an enhanced state of mind that can can affect your entire life.

AND IF YOU CAN YOUR DREAM UNDER CONTROL, YOU CAN HAVE YOUR LIFE UNDER CONTROL.

Think of it – if you can control your situation while “unconscious”, what can you achieve when you are conscious.

Lucid Dreamers Show Better Self-Reflecting Capabilities When Awake

The ability to control what happens in one’s dreams is an endearing prospect, so much so that there are pages of information online which supposedly help individuals achieve this curious state, which is known as lucid dreaming. Despite being a well-recognized phenomenon, we still know very little about it, nor why some people seem to experience it more frequently than others.
Now, a new study by scientists at the Max Planck Institute has offered some novel insight into the subject with the finding that a particular brain region known to be involved in self-reflection is larger in lucid dreamers. According to the researchers, this could mean that lucid dreamers are better at self-reflecting during wakefulness.

During a lucid dream individuals are aware that they are dreaming but have not left the sleep state. Some people are even able to control what is happening in the dream, allowing them to dream about anything they desire. Although lucid dreaming is poorly understood, studies have shown that frequent lucid dreamers demonstrate  greater insight in everyday life than nonlucid dreamers.

As described in The Journal of Neuroscience, the brain images revealed that the most frequent lucid dreamers had greater volume in a brain region called the anterior prefrontal cortex compared to those within the low-lucidity group. Alongside this apparent change in brain structure, the researchers also observed differences in brain function. They found that those in the highly lucid group displayed more activity in this brain region during megacognitive, or thought monitoring, tests while awake.

These findings suggest a relationship between metacognition, in particular thought monitoring, and lucid dreaming and that these two abilities share neural networks.

Source: IFLScience